Off-topic chat. May contain offensive language or images.
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By Travis Bickle
#471935
chrysostom wrote:Whilst I agree, Cinema prices in some places are tantamount to theft. Probably due to the rise in piracy.

I can't remember who posted it, but this sums up my justification for piracy (on the basis that I buy the DVDs when they're available).

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/game_of_thrones


I If you saw a film at the cinema and liked it, wouldnt you be likely to get the DVD as well when it became available?
By R94N
#471940
I disagree with the film industry complaining about piracy as directly being loss of sales. Sure, some of those pirated copies could have been sales but there were probably many people that pirated the film that wouldn't have bought it legally anyway. And since they can be copied infinitely there wasn't really any loss of revenue because they wouldn't have bought it anyway. They seem to still think so but you can never completely stop piracy from happening.
By Emmy
#471942
Nicola_Red wrote:
Yudster wrote:When I started school at four I could already read fluently - I have no idea why, my mum says she didn't teach me and my dad certainly didn't. Its just one of those things I could just do. When I was still 5 the school asked me to bring in whatever I was reading at home because I had devoured every book in the place, and I will never forget the look on my teacher's face when I brought the biographical account of Thor Heyerdahl's Kon Tiki expedition which I was halfway through (my dad had finished it and passed it to me, he knew I'd enjoy it)..


I could read before I got to school too, but I don't think I was quite that advanced! I just remember scoffing at the books they expected us to read, the ones with a picture and one word on the page. I was straight onto Janet & John :)


I could read before I started school too, in fact my mum claims I could read at 18 months because she'd get up in the morning and find me 'reading' books to myself in my cot, but strangely enough I've never quite believed her on that one! I could definitely read before I turned four though, and I remember insisting on being the one to read bedtime stories to my dad. My favourites were the 'Ramona' books, if anyone remembers them? They were turned into a tv series at one point too.

As a child and teenager I would regularly read two or three books a week, and more during school holidays, but since I started working I've become quite lazy where reading is concerned. I have recently started to try to make more time to indulge in books and still read a good bit during holidays, but I feel like I should be getting though more of them.

This summer some the books I've read and enjoyed include 'Quiet. The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking', 'The End of the Wasp Season', 'In The Midst Of Life', 'The Land of Decoration' and 'The Weird Sisters', and several Jodi Picoult and Diana Chamberlain novels. I'm currently reading Mark Radcliffe's 'Reelin' in the Years' and I may re-read some of my mum's Maeve Binchy books too after the sad news about her this week.
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By English Bob
#471946
Oooh a book thread! I love reading. It was the Discworld books which got me into reading in a big way, now I read a massive variety of stuff! *glances at groaning bookshelves*

My recent reads:

A Dance With Dragons, by George R R Martin. The latest book in the excellent Song of Ice & Fire series (Game of Thrones for all you TV folk :D )

Boneshaker, by Cherie Priest. A steampunk novel set in an alternate 1860's Seattle, full of zeppelins and zombies :D

Currently reading Sharpe's Trafalgar, by Bernard Cornwell. I loved the Sharpe TV series as a kid, so I thought I'd give the books a go. I love books set in the 18th/19th centuries, the British Empire and all that!
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By Bas
#471954
English Bob wrote:Oooh a book thread! I love reading. It was the Discworld books which got me into reading in a big way, now I read a massive variety of stuff! *glances at groaning bookshelves*

My recent reads:

A Dance With Dragons, by George R R Martin. The latest book in the excellent Song of Ice & Fire series (Game of Thrones for all you TV folk :D )

Boneshaker, by Cherie Priest. A steampunk novel set in an alternate 1860's Seattle, full of zeppelins and zombies :D

Currently reading Sharpe's Trafalgar, by Bernard Cornwell. I loved the Sharpe TV series as a kid, so I thought I'd give the books a go. I love books set in the 18th/19th centuries, the British Empire and all that!

Try the Flashman books then , Bob
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By Yudster
#471966
Mr Yudster loves Terry Pratchett but I don't like his books. I think he writes great jokes, and writes a lot of witty ideas, but they don't hang together cohesively for me, and his plot development systems annoy me. I know I'm in a minority, not loving Pratchett seems to be tantamount to strangling kittens these days, but ho hum. Having said I don't like the books though, I do think they adapt to the screen brilliantly and I have really enjoyed the films Sky have made of some of them.
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By Bas
#471983
Yudster wrote:Mr Yudster loves Terry Pratchett but I don't like his books. I think he writes great jokes, and writes a lot of witty ideas, but they don't hang together cohesively for me, and his plot development systems annoy me. I know I'm in a minority, not loving Pratchett seems to be tantamount to strangling kittens these days, but ho hum. Having said I don't like the books though, I do think they adapt to the screen brilliantly and I have really enjoyed the films Sky have made of some of them.



I love the Discworld books, but i know what you mean.
Its very often the case that the endings are either hurried or confused. He does (or maybe sadly now did) seem more interested in the wordplay & puns - which, i have to be honest, is why i love them in the first place.

The best exceptions to this, though, are the Tiffany Aching books, which i reckon are outstanding & his best work.

If you want to read books about a youngster discovering a world of magic , power & the confusion of growing up, well f**k off Potter, these are light years ahead.
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By DevilsDuck
#471984
I have only ever enjoyed one Pratchett book and that was Mort. I find them very difficult to read.

I currently am reading Roald Dahl books to my kids which is great, I also seem to read a lot of Mr Men and Thomas the tank engine books!

I cant remember what the last book I read for me was
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By MK Chris
#472087
I often can't get into fiction books, which I think is a shame, though like Tim I do like a good read of reference books, particularly true crime, which fascinates me. I DID read lots when I was at school and I still LOVE Roald Dahl - I will be reading my Roald Dahl boxset to Reuben too.
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By Nicola_Red
#472098
Just finished How To Be A Woman and bought three new books in the kindle sale - 99p each, bargain:

Stardust Memories by Ray Connolly
I Suck At Girls by Justin Halpern (the guy who does S*** My Dad Says on twitter)
Schadenfreude by Tim Lihoreau

Pretty much all bought on spec, so I'll see how I go with them.
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By DevilsDuck
#472102
Nicola_Red wrote:Just finished How To Be A Woman


Was that a text book?
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By Nicola_Red
#472105
In a way, yeah.
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By St@rk
#472532
I am currently reading "The First Law" series by Joe Abercrombie (again)

After that it's probably time to go down the library and sign up ;)
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By Bruvva
#472548
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By Badger Mark
#477873
Although I lurked for a long time before joining up yesterday, I never really paid much attention to the "Ramble" forum. Nice to see a book thread here (even though it's been inactive for a month). Looked over the earlier posts to see what people were reading at the time. I've read all the Fire and Ice series by George RR Martin. Great series, although I can appreciate why some might find it daunting. Those are some LONG books! Been watching the TV adaptation as well. Not as good as the books of course, but still a pretty solid adaptation.

I read both fiction and non-fiction and my tastes are a bit eclectic. I also listen to audiobooks a lot. Most often on my way home from work. Currently reading 14 by Peter Clines. If you liked the TV show Lost, this book has a number of elements that are very Lost-like. The book centers around a group of people living in a really odd apartment building that has a number of mysteries associated with it. For example, no two apartments have the same floor plan, there's a couple of units that are never rented for unknown reasons and there are mysterious mutant c_ockroaches [word filter made me do that] inhabiting the building. Unlike Lost, however, so far most of answers behind the mysteries were revealed relatively quickly. I'm not done with it yet, but it's a really good read so far. If anyone like zombie genre books, you might want to check out Clines' earlier books Ex-Heroes and Ex-Patriots. Both are a mashup of zombies and superheroes (including zombie superheroes). Both are a couple of fun reads. In contrast, I recently finished Absolute Monarchs: A History of the Papacy by John Julius Norwich. I admit - a bit of a heavy read, but it's a topic I've always been interested in.
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By Sazza
#478773
I read a lot of books, I don't prefer any specific genre as such so I mostly go on recommendations from other people and online reviews. I have just read Send Me No Flowers and Sweetie, both written by Jenny Tomlin. Excellent books, very graphic and extremely well written. They are certainly not for the faint hearted.
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By neilt0
#478780
When I was a kiddie, I used to read a ton of books. I think the library let you take 2 or 3 books out at a time, and I used to read them very quickly, I was getting through 6 books a week. I learned to speed read, and I still speed read now.

Then I used to run the book stall with my parents at charity events, and I'd pick up lotsa books.

Nowadays, I hardly read fiction at all, there are just too many other distractions -- films, TV, podcasts etc.

I do still read a lot, but it's all online -- newspaper sites, tech sites etc. I can just about stay focused on a long magazine article, but that's about it.

The last 3 books I've bought are still unopened. :(
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By Nicola_Red
#478796
I read a book approximately every two weeks. I'm in the middle of some langauge-geek book I can't even recall the name of at the moment. Next up is My Family and Other Disasters by Lucy Mangan, which was on offer for Kindle at £2.99. Bargain.
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By Nicola_Red
#478941
The language book I couldn't recall the name of is The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language by Mark Forsyth.
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By Bas
#478969
Nicola_Red wrote:The language book I couldn't recall the name of is The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language by Mark Forsyth.

Sounds a right laugh riot. :D











To be honest, it doesn't sound that bad, i'll look lout for it.
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By Nicola_Red
#478971
It is! It's fascinating. But I am fascinated by geeky language stuff like that.
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By Travis Bickle
#479177
Finished Scott Mills' book recently. It's only a light read and very brief, but I found it hilarious. Despite not being in the slightest bit a Mills fan I found it laugh out loud funny pretty much throughout. There is a fair amount of serious stuff in it too though.

Just started reading A Life Too Short by Ronald Reng. It is the story of German goalkeeper Robert Enke who commited suicide a couple of years ago. It won the William Hill sportsbook of the year so it comes recommended.
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By Yudster
#491625
So you have. Shall we talk about films?!

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